Green Streak Ammunition - The New and Improved Tracer Round

Green Streak Ammunition
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Green Streak Ammunition - The New and Improved Tracer Round

Green Streak Ammunition…Tracer Bullets…But Better

Whether you were a service member or civilian, if you've ever had the opportunity to participate in a nighttime shooting exercise, chances are you've seen firsthand how much fun tracer ammunition can be.

What makes it fun? Unlike routine daytime shooting drills, when it's dark outside, you can see the bullets fly downrange (and it's an incredible sight.) But shooting tracer rounds for most civilians is a rare occurrence. Not only is the ammo hard to come by due to availability, but more importantly, tracer rounds tend to set things on fire.

Conventional tracers have a chemical compound in the bullet's base that burns quite brightly as it flies down range. That's great for visibility but not so great for preventing "burning down the house." Another less-than-desirable quality of tracers is they tend not to be very accurate. But shooting tracers is fun and can be helpful in civilian applications for low-light training. Fortunately, there is now an alternative that isn't the equivalent of launching miniature flares at your target and beyond.

Enter Green Streak Ammunition from Ammo Inc. This is a new offering in their Streak ammunition line, which they describe as "Visual Ammunition" rather than calling it tracer ammunition.

Green Streak ammo and the previously introduced Streak are available for handgun cartridges only. Referred to as "non-incendiary," Green Streak uses patented technology to give the shooter the visual effect of a tracer with zero burning compounds in the bullet.

9mm Green Streak Visual Ammunition

This means the projectile creates no greater fire risk indoors or outdoors than any other standard ammunition and bullet. Why is this significant? Because it implies that Streak Ammo is safer to use in any indoor range, outdoor range, and environment/situation where traditional copper jacketed bullets are okay to use.

How Does It Work

So how does Streak achieve its tracer-esque performance without the fire hazard? Through patented, non-flammable technology that seems simple but is deceptively clever. In this case, the technology involves coating the base of the pistol bullets with a proprietary photo-luminescent compound.

How does Green Streak Ammo WorkGreen Streak 9mm Ammo Breakdown

In other words, a glow-in-the-dark coating that is "charged" by the flash of the burning propellent makes the bullet's base visible in low light and in darkness while in flight.

It's one of those technologies that seems intuitive after the fact, is straightforward, and makes sense, but is novel and inventive. Green Streak's photo luminescence is not surprisingly green, while the original Streak ammunition lights up a bright red.

What’s available

Green Streak Ammunition (and the previously introduced Streak Red Ammo) can be purchased in the following cartridges:

.38 Spl.380 Auto
9mm.44 Magnum
.45 Colt.45 Auto

and 40 S&W - for those who like unnecessary recoil and are gluttons for punishment.

Both jacketed hollow point and total metal jacket ammunition are available for each cartridge. To learn more about Green Streak Ammunition and the specific cartridges available, check out their website at Ammo Inc. 

Accuracy

While shooting what looks like laser beams in low light sounds fun and exciting, which it is, accuracy is also essential. To test the ammunition and its accuracy, a set of grouping shots were fired at the end of the daylight hours to dispense with any of the difficulties presented by shooting at low light or in darkness.

Accuracy was shot at 25yds with Streak from a Ruger PC Carbine and a Maxim Defense MD9 Pistol. Accuracy was more than acceptable. This was to be expected because, unlike conventional tracers, Streak Ammo does not have anything burning in the base of the bullet, which changes the mass and balance as the bullet flies downrange.

Light It Up

Having determined Green Streak Ammunition has more than adequate accuracy, it was time to light it up, figuratively and literally. My first visibility shots were taken roughly 15 minutes before sunset, which is still pretty visible /light outside. Shooting from a Gen5 Glock 19 and a Maxim Defense MD9, it was possible to see the flight path and point of impact. I didn't try a magnified optic as some people might have on a carbine. Still, it was visible with open sights and while using a red dot.

Not surprisingly, it was easier and frankly more satisfying to shoot at longer distances because the bullet was visible for a longer micro-second of time. At 50yds, it became much easier to see the bullet fly to the target. As it continued getting darker outside, it became easier to see the projectile streak down range (and in this instance, yes. "Streak" is the appropriate word and not just a kitschy reference).

Now the fun part - Shooting Green Streak Ammo in total darkness. I wanted to test it two ways. First, to see how visible it was with only the target lit enough to identify and with a weapon light shining the entire length from the gun to the target. Green Streak was visible in both situations.

Field Testing Green Streak 9mm AmmoStreak Visualization Ammo Testing

It is important to note that using a weapon light will show smoke from the cartridge, which could somewhat obscure your view of the target and the actual glowing projectile. If not using a weapon light, Green Streak bullets flew down range like blaster shots in a Star Wars movie, depending on your generation. Nevertheless, it's pretty damn satisfying.

Check out our Green Streak Visual Ammo Video Review here: 

Why Use Streak?

Ok, let's get this out of the way. Shooting Streak ammunition is fun, a lot of fun. Maybe not shooting-unlimited-free-ammo-out-of-a-minigun fun, but fun nonetheless. Also, as a bonus, you can pretend you're a Stormtrooper that can ACTUALLY hit something.
That said, there are some practical applications worth considering.

Anyone wanting to be prepared for self-defensive shooting should make the time for some low-light or no-light shooting practice. Having shot the Crimson Trace Midnight 3-Gun match three years in a row, I can say that pretty much everything looks different than when shooting in bright daylight. Therefore, it's imperative to know what your sight picture, irons or red dot, look like in low light while illuminated with a flashlight or weapon light, etc.

Streak ammunition can also tell you where your shots are hitting, particularly when you miss the target. Why is this helpful? Because you'll be able to make corrections while firing in low light or darkness, where you might not otherwise be able to make corrections or learn from your misses.

Common wisdom regarding tracers is that they "work both ways." However, that's not the case with Green Streak Ammunition. The greater the angle from behind the bullet, the more difficult it is to see. Because Green Streak is visible only to the shooter, it does have potential tactical applications. Green Streak Ammo allows the defensive shooter to see the point of impact and make corrections if necessary without the visual ammunition helping direct return fire.

Conclusion

Overall, Green Streak Ammunition does everything it claims to do. It is accurate, non-incendiary, and visible in low light or total darkness, but only from the shooter's position. Because the conditions are so different between low light and daytime at the range, it's an excellent idea for all defensive shooters to train periodically in low-light settings to maintain familiarity. 

Green Streak Ammunition Products

Would you be interested in testing this next generation of visual ammunition for yourself?

If so, we have you covered. Ammunition Depot is your leading destination for firearms, firearm accessories, and ammo for sale online. Purchase a box or case of Green Streak Ammo today!

Have you already tried Green Streak Ammunition? Let us know your thoughts and experiences in the comment section below.

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